How to make money by crossing animals: new horizons

There is a bit of tension in Animal Crossing games. On the one hand, you have enough freedom to explore a city, make friends and live life as you see fit. On the other hand, you start with a fairly large debt to Tom Nook. You can choose to reduce this debt little by little or ignore it entirely. These are certainly options, but I prefer to focus on reimbursement as quickly as possible. I don’t like having this figure over my head and, more importantly, I like having all the housing improvements that come with credit worthiness – even if they mean more debt. Here’s how I paid for my expenses in New Horizons.

The start of the game

New Horizons starts with a slightly different proposition: you don’t pay your initial travel costs with bells (Animal Crossing motto). Instead, you redeem Nook Miles in a kiosk in his tent. These miles can be earned by taking up challenges, which are highlighted on your new phone. This part of the game is pretty self explanatory. You are basically rewarded for almost everything, and the miles will flow. There are several simple ones that require almost no effort as well. Do them if you are looking for simple ways to earn miles at first, which may not be as obvious.

– Post a message on the city bulletin board, which should be right next to Nook’s tent.
– Use your phone’s camera to take a photo. No matter what you take.
– Access your passport, add a quote and a personalized title.

Move right

Okay. Once you have paid your first debt to Mr. Nook, he will offer you a home upgrade. You may as well accept it, because tent life is not an ideal permanent solution. At this point we move on to the more familiar denomination. You always earn miles for challenges, but your debt can only be resolved with large bags of these precious bells. Like Nook Miles, there are many ways to earn bells. Some are more lucrative than others. Here are some of the things you should prioritize if you want to live debt-free as soon as possible.

Look for fruit

Selling fruit is an easy way to make bells in the early hours of New Horizons. You don’t need any special equipment; just shake a tree and the fruit will fall. Bring this fruit to Nook’s nephews, and they’ll take it from you in exchange for bells. Easy enough. The problem is that you don’t get much for your efforts. Earning 100 bells for each piece of native fruit is good at first, but you quickly become too big. It’s time to branch out!

New Horizons allows you to charter a plane to a random island, starting on the second day after the start of the game. Tom Nook gives you a free ticket when the option is available, and you can redeem 2000 Nook Miles at his kiosk to purchase additional tickets. I wouldn’t go all out on these tickets, but it’s not a bad idea to buy a few; things like the pocket organizers (which allow you to carry more items) and the item wheel should be given priority, however.
Go to your island’s airport and tell the counter at the counter that you want to fly. Follow the instructions and use one of your tickets. Now cross your fingers.

If you are lucky, you will arrive on an island that has a different type of fruit from your original base. Potential fruits are apples, cherries, oranges, peaches and pears. You can also find coconuts on these remote islands. Have you found a new fruit? Awesome! Bring it home and plant it (dig a hole then bury the fruit in it). After a few days, you have a new fruit tree that produces a more lucrative crop; non-native fruit can be sold for 500 bells per pop. Since each tree bears three fruits simultaneously, you are considering a fairly significant upgrade from what you started – 1,500 versus 300.

Coconuts are a little different. They are only worth 250, the trees produce only two coconuts at a time, and the trees must be planted on the beach. They’re a nice visual upgrade for your ribs, but don’t consider them investments.

It is also a great idea to talk to your friends and see what fruits they have discovered. Visit their island, via a local cooperative or online, and you can trade.

Not another insect hunt

The next way to earn bells requires some equipment. Specifically, you’re going to need a net. Once you have one, you can roam the land for all kinds of creepy things. It should be noted that the next methods of manufacturing bells have an optional detour. Insects and fish can be given initially to Tom Nook, then possibly to the museum’s curator, Blathers. Blathers will take the first specimen of each type of bug and add it to their collection. You don’t have to, but I personally like having a finished museum. It can sting a bit when you drop a specimen worth 10,000 bells or more, but there is always more where it comes from.

Okay. Back to bugs. You see these things everywhere. Get close to them and swing your net to hang them. It can be a little tricky at first, and you’re probably going to swing, miss, and scare more bugs than you’d like. Hang on. You might consider training with butterflies, as they don’t disappear into the air when you breathe. Once you feel confident, look around the flowers and the forest floor for insects. If you hold down the A button, you enter a tracking mode. You’re moving slowly, but you’re not as likely to scare your prices with your big steps.

Insects and fish appear on their own schedules. Animal Crossing uses your Switch’s clock settings, so the creatures you can get will vary depending on the month and time you play, as well as the weather. Your Critterpedia app is a handy reference that shows when different creatures are available, with entries added automatically after you find or catch one for the first time. It also indicates if your take was given to the museum, which is particularly useful if you share an island with other players.

There are a few types of bugs that do not appear in the open. For example, wasps appear when you shake a tree that contains one of their nests. When it falls, you only have a few seconds to get into position and swing your swarm net. Miss, and you get stung – and your eye swells to prove it. Bedbugs and millipedes sometimes appear when you hit rocks at random. When you shake trees, sometimes a spider or a bag worm slides on its wire before returning to the tree. If your net is not already equipped, you can prepare it, shake the same tree again and catch the bug. The most annoying bug to find, at least in the spring, is mole cricket. You hear its buzz and it’s nowhere in sight. Go to where it chirps the loudest and start digging with your shovel. Finally, you will dig it up. None of these hard-to-find bugs are particularly valuable, and I only researched them to hand them over to Blathers to watch him squirm.

OK, if the mole crickets are not worth tracking down, which bugs are a priority? Here is a brief overview of the five most valuable bugs I have encountered. Keep in mind that this is for the period that I play, which is spring. More bugs will arrive with the new seasons, and they are also likely to be valuable.

  • Tarantula – 8,000
  • Emperor butterfly – 4000
  • Peacock butterfly – 2500
  • Praying mantis – 2400
  • Tiger beetle – 1500

In my experience, the value of other bugs drops sharply after these five. For this reason, I have not found bug hunting to be a particularly efficient use of my time. The tarantula is quite a price, but they only appear in the evening and these are pretty rare finds – and they knock you out if you miss your swing. Emperor butterflies are more common, and I will certainly hunt them when I see them. Otherwise, I tend to focus my attention elsewhere.

Here’s a full list of all the bugs I’ve managed to collect so far, and their value:

  • Bag worm – 600
  • Millipede – 300
  • Citrus Longhorn Beetle – 350
  • Emperor butterfly – 4000
  • Hermit Crab – 1000
  • Ladybug – 200
  • Male Face Thumbtack – 1000
  • Mantis – 430
  • Cricket Mole – 500
  • Butterfly – 130
  • Praying mantis – 2400
  • Peacock butterfly – 2500
  • Pill bug – 250
  • Snail – 250
  • Spider – 600
  • Stinkbug – 120
  • Tarantula – 8,000
  • Tiger beetle – 1500
  • Tiger butterfly – 240
  • Wharf Gardon – 200
  • Yellow butterfly – 160

Fishing for fun and profit

Insects can be a bit of a bust, but there is always fishing. Once you have a pole, you can attack the sea, rivers and ponds for their generosity. Unlike bugs, there is an element of surprise that comes with fishing; you don’t always know what you will get until your line arrives. This can be a big surprise (coelacanths!), Or a complete disappointment (old tires.). Consult your Critterpedia to see when and where the best catches appear and get to know the comparative size of their underwater shadows to at least tip the scales in your favor. In general, the larger the shade, the more valuable the catch. Well, apart from these bars, which will likely become your enemies. Back to Davy Jones’ locker with all of you!

The two best catches I have found so far are the golden trout and the coelacanth. The two sell 15,000 bells, which makes their research a priority. However, this can be a bit tricky. The coelacanth appears only on rainy days. And golden trout can only be fished in raised rivers. Depending on the configuration of your island, it can be particularly difficult to hang, because it can be inconvenient or inaccessible to you. You can optionally unlock tools to facilitate navigation in these river areas, but even after terraforming my island and building bridges and ramps, I found that sea fishing is much easier and more reliable than rivers or the ponds. Of course, your mileage may vary.

There are many different fish that you can catch, depending on where you dip your line. In old-fashioned Animal Crossing, fish were divided into two categories: rivers and seas. In New Horizon, you have these areas as well as a variety of different subsections, such as river mouths, ponds, cliff-side rivers and piers. Fish as many places as possible when you start out and check out your Critterpedia when looking for particular varieties.

Here are some of the most precious fish I have seen. Once you have maximized your inventory, you can easily create 40,000 or more bells with each run.

  • Coelacanth – 15,000
  • Golden trout – 15,000
  • Blue Marlin – 10,000
  • Sturgeon – 10,000
  • Oarfish – 9,000
  • Tuna – 7,000
  • Crossed knife bit – 5000
  • Koi – 4000
  • Red snapper – 3000
  • Football fish – 2500

It’s just a small selection of what I caught. The remainder has a variable value, none approaching those highlighted above. You can fish for trash, including boots, cans and old tires. They are practically worthless, but I recommend that you put them in your home storage; you can then use them to make them…. Interesting elements.

You can also find seashells on the beaches. I pick them up because I don’t like clutter, but they don’t have much value. The giant clam is the exception, with 900 bells, but it is hardly a bargain. Here is an overview of all the fish (and garbage) that I have recovered, as well as the types of shells that I have discovered.

  • Anchovies – 200
  • Crossed knife bit – 5000
  • Bitter – 900
  • Black bass – 400
  • Bluegill – 180
  • Blue Marlin – 10,000
  • Boot – 10
  • Carp – 300
  • Char – 3,800
  • Cherry salmon – 1000
  • Coelacanth – 15,000
  • Conch – 700
  • Coral – 500
  • Cowrie – 60
  • Cruciferous carp – 160
  • Stamp – 300
  • Dace – 240
  • Empty box – 10
  • Football fish – 2500
  • Freshwater goby – 400
  • Giant clam – 900
  • Golden trout – 15,000
  • Hermit Crab – 1000
  • Horse mackerel – 150
  • Koi – 4000
  • Loach – 400
  • Japanese clam – 100
  • Oarfish – 9,000
  • Old tire – 10
  • Plaice – 800
  • Pale Chub – 200
  • Glowing eyes goldfish – 1300
  • Red snapper – 3000
  • Sand Dollar – 120
  • Bar – 400
  • Sea butterfly – 1000
  • Sea snail – 180
  • Pierre – 75
  • Sturgeon – 10,000
  • Tadpole – 100
  • Tuna – 7,000
  • Venus comb – 300
  • Yellow perch – 300

Finally, itinerant merchants will evolve periodically. These people are interested in insects or fish, and they will buy them from you at prices 50% higher than those offered by Nooks. As you can imagine, this can be huge if you have the time to collect these items.

Odds and end for desperate times.

I love to fish, and it’s the most reliable way I’ve found to make money in New Horizons. There are a few other things you can do too, but I can’t recommend them as the main source of income.

First, you can collect a variety of raw materials from around the world, which can be used to make tools and furniture. Nook’s boys will buy them for you as well, which can be an option if you’re particularly tough. I do not recommend it, however. Keep these things in stock, if possible; you never know when you are going to need these materials and other items, and you better have them when you need them. The outlier is the gold nugget. I found a few in bonking rocks with my shovel, but they are rare. They are also valued at 10,000 bells, which makes them tempting to sell them. I do not recommend that you do so. I have some craft recipes that call them out, and I suspect they would be used to create unbreakable tools – if such things exist. Just to be sure, I recommend hanging them.

Turnip markets are another way of making bells, but it can be risky. Every Sunday, a traveling boar comes to visit, carrying turnips. You buy them at their current market value, which will then fluctuate throughout the week. The goal is to sell them when they are worth more than what you paid for them, but the market is fickle and unpredictable. Sit on it too long – in this case, until the following Sunday – and they will spoil themselves. Spoiled turnips are about as precious as you might imagine.

The market has the potential to make you nice money, but I tend to stay away in favor of more reliable income opportunities. Your mileage may vary, however.

Here is a brief overview of some of the common resources and other items you can sell to the Nooks. It’s pretty disastrous compared to your other options, as you can see, which is why I only consider it as a last resort option:

  • Bamboo piece – 80
  • Bamboo shoot – 250
  • Clay – 100
  • Bunch of weeds – 10
  • Coconut – 250
  • Flowers – 40
  • Gold nugget – 10,000
  • Hardwood – 60
  • Iron Nugget – 375
  • Softwoods – 60
  • Pierre – 75
  • Tree branch – 5
  • Wasps nest – 300
  • Wood – 60
  • Young spring bamboo – 200

There is one last category of things you can sell, and these are fossils. After digging them up and identifying them, you can sell them for several thousand bells. I don’t want to tell you how you should play Animal Crossing, but you can or can be a maniac if you don’t try to donate these finds to the museum before selling them. You will get duplicate fossils over time – these islands are pretty incredible places – which should reduce the donation sting in the first few weeks. Plus, you’re helping science!

That’s about it for the moment. These are the best ways I have found to win bells in New Horizon. I’m sure I missed a fish, bug, or item, but I’ll add them to the list as I find them. I will also be offering new additions throughout the year. Looking at my Critterpedia, there are a ton of things we haven’t seen yet. Hope they are worth looking for!
In the meantime, here is the full list of articles I found:

  • Anchovies – 200
  • Bag worm – 600
  • Bamboo piece – 80
  • Bamboo shoot – 250
  • Crossed knife bit – 5000
  • Bitter – 900
  • Black bass – 400
  • Bluegill – 180
  • Blue Marlin – 10,000
  • Boot – 10
  • Carp – 300
  • Millipede – 300
  • Char – 3,800
  • Cherry salmon – 1000
  • Citrus Longhorn Beetle – 350
  • Clay – 100
  • Bunch of weeds – 10
  • Coconut – 250
  • Coelacanth – 15,000
  • Conch – 700
  • Coral – 500
  • Cowrie – 60
  • Cruciferous carp – 160
  • Stamp – 300
  • Dace – 240
  • Emperor butterfly – 4000
  • Empty box – 10
  • Flowers – 40
  • Football fish – 2500
  • Freshwater goby – 400
  • Fruit (native) – 100
  • Fruits (exotic) – 500
  • Giant clam – 900
  • Gold nugget – 10,000
  • Golden trout – 15,000
  • Hardwood – 60
  • Hermit Crab – 1000
  • Honey bee – 200
  • Horse mackerel – 150
  • Iron Nugget – 375
  • Koi – 4000
  • Ladybug – 200
  • Loach – 400
  • Male Face Thumbtack – 1000
  • Japanese clam – 100
  • Mantis – 430
  • Cricket Mole – 500
  • Butterfly – 130
  • Oarfish – 9,000
  • Old tire – 10
  • Plaice – 800
  • Praying mantis – 2400
  • Pale Chub – 200
  • Peacock butterfly – 2500
  • Pill bug – 250
  • Glowing eyes goldfish – 1300
  • Red snapper – 3000
  • Sand Dollar – 120
  • Bar – 400
  • Sea butterfly – 1000
  • Sea snail – 180
  • Snail – 250
  • Softwoods – 60
  • Spider – 600
  • Stinkbug – 120
  • Pierre – 75
  • Sturgeon – 10,000
  • Tadpole – 100
  • Tadpole – 100
  • Tarantula – 8,000
  • Tiger beetle – 1500
  • Tiger butterfly – 240
  • Tree branch – 5
  • Tuna – 7,000
  • Venus comb – 300
  • Venus comb – 300
  • Wasps nest – 300
  • Wharf Gardon – 200
  • Wood – 60
  • Yellow butterfly – 160
  • Yellow perch – 300
  • Young spring bamboo – 200

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